Why Thanksgiving fluctuations may not necessarily have to be Google Updates

29. November 2015, 08:47

All over the past week there has been major movement in the Google SERPs and many SEOs believe that the source of all the commotion is a Google Update. Google’s John Mueller, however, said on Twitter that these may just be regular changes to their Algorithms and not a Google Update.

My goal for this post is to give you an explanation of why such ranking changes do not have to be Google Updates. These ranking changes can be observed, measured and, if you understand them well, you can gain great benefits from them. Let me start at a fundamental principle and give you some precise examples. Read Full Article

UK Top 100 Domains – The most visible Websites on

17. November 2015, 14:37

SISTRIX has been analyzing the visibility of practically all domains with rankings on, since 2010. This SISTRIX Visibility Index score is well suited to easily compare domains with each other. It is also ideal if you want to measure and evaluate the success of SEO actions taken or if you want to analyse the impact of Google’s algorithm changes on a domain. The Visibility Index can also be broken down to evaluate subdomains, directories and individual URLs on the domain.

The Visibility Index allows for compelling competitive analysis of your competitors. You can identify the most successful websites for a certain segment, discover the reasons for their success and use this knowledge as a “best practice example” to increase the success of your own project. Thus, it is easy to recognize and adapt SEO-methods which have been successful and are ideal to follow.

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Has been hit by a Manual Link Penalty?

10. November 2015, 10:53
Visibility Index of

Visibility Index for

The Visibility Index score for has crashed and there are no signs that the domain name has changed or that a redesign took place.

On the Visibility Index chart for you can see that SISTRIX automatically adds pins noting known Google updates, if the domain’s visibility has significantly changed within the week of the update. Apparently, reacted sensitively to Google Panda, though right before the domain’s visibility crashed, there are no signs indicating a Google penalty.

It therefore begs the question if has been hit by a Manual Action by Google. Could it have been a manual Link Penalty? Let’s check the facts.
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The Price of Changing the Domain Name

5. November 2015, 15:11

In theory, changing your domain name should not be complicated, especially if you follow the instructions Google provides. In practice, we can find numerous examples that contradict such rosy expectations. Changing the address of a website will always be accompanied by a certain degree of risk and the price you pay, in the end, could be higher than your initial estimates, with the currency usually being the search engine rankings you worked so hard for.

Visibility from when changed to

Visibility from when changed to

The most popular example is, where it took two long years before they managed to get back to the same level of visibility within Google that they had before the domain name change. This is also a great example for how Google can take a long time, three month in this case, before the entire domain was crawled and processed.

What are the consequences that a domain change can cause and what might be the reasons for a drop in visibility afterwards? In this blog post we will use a more recent example to show you what may happen after a domain name change. Read Full Article

Click probabilities in the Google SERPs

27. October 2015, 16:41

Ever since there has been such as thing as search engine optimization, the question of “How often are people clicking on each ranking position?” has been posed. Of course, there is no universal answer to this question – too many factors have a bearing on the click probability per position: the intention or the time of the search, the device used and many more. Despite this, people are regularly trying to give an answer and today, I would like to add another attempt. The charts are part of my lecture at this year’s SEODay in Cologne, Germany.

The following numbers are based on the new Google Search Console API. This allows data from the Search Console to be collected and processed automatically. We were the first tool provider to integrate this feature in our software, shortly after its release. Some of our customers have granted me permission to use their data for an anonymous and summarized evaluation – for which I would like to say thank you. Through this, 124,086,615 clicks from one week in September were accumulated.

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SEO-Basics: Never relaunch a website without redirects

16. October 2015, 10:30

A “relaunch” is effectively a “reboot” and in our case means the fundamental revision of a web presence. A so-called “website relaunch” does not have to be limited to design changes only. Rather, it gives you the opportunity to review and redesign content, simplify the navigation structure or optimize the speed of the content management system (CMS).

But beware! If you make several changes simultaneously, unwanted errors can sneak in and present you with far-reaching consequences. A classic case is that, after the relaunch, the site fails to get any visitors through the Google search.

The relaunch where we migrated to a new Content Management System, took place on 18/04/2015. We observed a massive drop in the site’s search rankings and by 20/04/2015 our traffic had fallen by a third. Quoting Sebastian, operator of the specialist portal in an interview

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All rankings gone: No more fashion news from

1. October 2015, 15:17

Within the month of September the website took a sharp drop in their visibility index, to be more precise a decline of more than 90%. Therefore the domain lost almost all of their keyword rankings on and But for which reason?

Visibility Index of

A rapidly decreasing visibility means a loss of good keyword rankings for the given domain name. How big is the impact exactly? Let’s find out by looking at the ranking changes in the given time frame where the domain visibility has decreased.  Read Full Article

Ranking data from Google’s Search Console: Use Cases and Limits

13. September 2015, 18:52

After having been in the talks for quite a while, Google finally unveiled its new, substantially expanded API interface a couple of weeks ago. It allows access to data from the Google Search Console (the late Google Webmaster Tools). Via this interface, it is now possible for the first time to access the data relating to one’s own domain automatically. Particularly, it is now possible to obtain data from the interesting area of search analysis. Over the past few weeks, we integrated this data into the Toolbox and learned a couple of things about Google Data. In this blog post, we want to tell you what to share what we discovered about the data, its uses and its limits. Read Full Article

Toolbox: Mobile data for all countries

21. July 2015, 18:41

From this week on, the SISTRIX Toolbox delivers data on the mobile ranking of countless search terms. As the first tool worldwide to do so, in addition to desktop rankings and visibility data, we offer smartphone data for all supported countries: Germany, Austria, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Poland, France, Italy, Spain, the UK as well as the US.

Google had recently publicized that, in more than ten markets, more searches are already made via mobile devices than over the traditional desktop browser – including the highly relevant search markets such as Japan and the US. We’ve taken this changing search behavior into account and now calculate, in parallel to desktop rankings, the same for the mobile Google index. Read Full Article

Google mobile update: initial findings

28. April 2015, 14:11

A week ago today, accompanied by much media interest, Google introduced the usability of websites on smartphones as a ranking factor for mobile searches. Unlike the well-known “penalty updates”, such as Penguin and Panda, it wasn’t an algorithm that could be armed and that directly had its full, negative effect. The effects of the new mobile ranking factor only reveal themselves after the Google bot has crawled a firm page and tested its mobile friendliness.

The dust has begun to settle: Google was busy last week and the first results of the new ranking factor are starting to come to light. Unlike as with the Panda/Penguin updates, we don’t want to publish a list of winners and losers on the blog. That’s because we, as the SEO branch, don’t firstly have to work out the causes with this update. Google made completely clear and transparent from the outset the criteria by which mobile-friendly sites will be ranked. There’s even a free test tool from Google to carry out this check right away and as often as you like. As an alternative, we want to show a few examples that are symptomatic of many sites that have lost or gained rankings through the mobile update. Read Full Article